Help for Eating Disorders

Do you or does someone you know struggle with an eating disorder?

Not sure? Try answering the following questions.

Do you or does someone you know:

  • Regularly obsess about food, weight, appearance, or exercise?
  • Get on the scale daily and feel good or bad, depending on the number?
  • Refuse to eat certain foods, progressing to restrictions against whole categories of food? (e.g., carbohydrates, fats, sugars, etc.)
  • Talk frequently about feeling fat or overweight, despite weight loss
  • Have food rituals? (e.g., eating foods in certain orders, excessive chewing, rearranging food on a plate)
  • Avoid mealtimes or situations involving food?
  • Exercise rigidly—despite weather, fatigue, illness, or injury?
  • Hide food?
  • Eat in secret?

If you answered “yes” to any of the questions listed above, then you or the person you know could be struggling with an eating disorder.

 

Most Common Eating Disorders

Anorexia Nervosa

  • Characterized by self-starvation (oftentimes individuals become alarmingly thin but do not perceive themselves as such)

Bulimia Nervosa

  • Characterized by binge/purge episodes (secretive in nature – person is often average weight) Purging methods include: self-induced vomiting, extreme exercise, abuse of laxatives or diuretics, and self-starvation.

Binge Eating Disorder

  • Characterized by regular binge episodes (eating large quantities of food in a relatively short amount of time) due to insatiable cravings occurring any time—day or night

EDNOS (Eating Disorders Not Otherwise Specified)

  • Atypical eating behaviors that are not characterized by the other established disorders.

 

Help for You

If you are concerned that you might have an eating disorder and would like to get help, we recommend the following:

Help for Someone Else

If you are concerned that a loved one might have an eating disorder and would like to know how you can help them, we recommend the following:

  • Pray (the most effective means of support you can provide)
  • Educate yourself about eating disorders at www.eatingdisorderhope.com
  • Talk with your friend/loved one about your concern in a private non-threatening setting
  • Encourage your friend/loved one to get help and provide available resources like Living in Truth Ministries
  • Let them know you truly care (offer love, support, and encouragement)
  • Meet your loved one where they are and remember that recovery time varies with each individual
  • Remember that eating disorders are complex and difficult to overcome. Although you cannot make your friend/loved one get well, you can point them to the One who can make them well—Jesus!

Do you or does someone you know struggle with an eating disorder?

Not sure? Try answering the following questions.

Do you or does someone you know:

  • Regularly obsess about food, weight, appearance, or exercise?
  • Get on the scale daily and feel good or bad, depending on the number?
  • Refuse to eat certain foods, progressing to restrictions against whole categories of food? (e.g., carbohydrates, fats, sugars, etc.)
  • Talk frequently about feeling fat or overweight, despite weight loss
  • Have food rituals? (e.g., eating foods in certain orders, excessive chewing, rearranging food on a plate)
  • Avoid mealtimes or situations involving food?
  • Exercise rigidly—despite weather, fatigue, illness, or injury?
  • Hide food?
  • Eat in secret?

If you answered “yes” to any of the questions listed above, then you or the person you know could be struggling with an eating disorder.

 

Most Common Eating Disorders

Anorexia Nervosa

  • Characterized by self-starvation (oftentimes individuals become alarmingly thin but do not perceive themselves as such)

Bulimia Nervosa

  • Characterized by binge/purge episodes (secretive in nature – person is often average weight) Purging methods include: self-induced vomiting, extreme exercise, abuse of laxatives or diuretics, and self-starvation.

Binge Eating Disorder

  • Characterized by regular binge episodes (eating large quantities of food in a relatively short amount of time) due to insatiable cravings occurring any time—day or night

EDNOS (Eating Disorders Not Otherwise Specified)

  • Atypical eating behaviors that are not characterized by the other established disorders.

 

Help for You

If you are concerned that you might have an eating disorder and would like to get help, we recommend the following:

Help for Someone Else

If you are concerned that a loved one might have an eating disorder and would like to know how you can help them, we recommend the following:

  • Pray (the most effective means of support you can provide)
  • Educate yourself about eating disorders at www.eatingdisorderhope.com
  • Talk with your friend/loved one about your concern in a private non-threatening setting
  • Encourage your friend/loved one to get help and provide available resources like Living in Truth Ministries
  • Let them know you truly care (offer love, support, and encouragement)
  • Meet your loved one where they are and remember that recovery time varies with each individual
  • Remember that eating disorders are complex and difficult to overcome. Although you cannot make your friend/loved one get well, you can point them to the One who can make them well—Jesus!